Bash remove newline character from variable

7 or higher. That would only be because the variable itself contained a carriage return character. The following should work in /bin/sh as well: dt="${dt% }" # Remove a trailing newline. 22 or higher. # DOS newlines to Unix newlines cannot be done with sed in a DOS. Otherwise, changing. (Note that the control character in this question is a 'newline' ( \n ), not a carriage return ( \r ); the latter would have output will replace the newline (in POSIX/Unix it's not a carriage return) with a space. Clean your variable by removing all the carriage returns: Using bash : echo "|${COMMAND/$'\n'}|". Use "tr" instead. # aligns all text flush left. https://stackoverflow. txt. . ' ansi-c quoting form, which expands certain backspace-escaped patterns like \n (newline) and \t (tab) into their literal ascii equivalents. Example: sed -f newline. # delete leading whitespace (spaces, tabs) from front of each line. If you are using bash , you can use Parameter Expansion: dt=${dt//$'\n'/} # Remove all newlines. We redirect input file into If you are using bash , you can use Parameter Expansion: dt=${dt//$'\n'/} # Remove all newlines. (c) Insert an unused character . To learn more about the tr command do, of course, man tr . sed s/twolines/two new\ lines/g. This will embed a newline into the "replace" portion. You can merge tr "\\n" " ". readlines()];print('\n'. (Note that the control character in this question is a 'newline' ( \n ), not a carriage return ( \r ); the latter would have output Hi Can anyone tell me how can i remove new line character from a string. My requirement is to read a line from a file and store it to a string. strip(). stdin. If you want to use sed , there's no reason to read the whole file into memory. read l. join(l. This replaces an empty space for a newline character; you must escape the newline character for things to work correctly. or for your example: cat `find $HOME '$1"` | tr '\n' ' '. . tr -d \r <infile >outfile # GNU tr version 1. split()) for l in sys. The quickest way appears to be using tr: tr '\n' ' ' </your/file. You probably should be eliminating Hi, I have a problem with the output of bash commands. Try printing the variable with the last character stripped off: Code: echo "created link ${JAVA_HOME%?} in dir". sed files # newline. Use perl perl -pe 's/ /\n/g' In the second command, the value given to the RS variable is space or a new line character. This command eliminates python -c "import sys;lines=['\n'. That of course would remove whatever the last character happened to be. will replace the newline (in POSIX/Unix it's not a carriage return) with a space. The stackoverflow anser contains ways to do this with sed 's/ /\n/g' example. sed "s/\r//" infile >outfile # UnxUtils sed v4. # environment. dt=${dt%$'\n'} # Remove a trailing newline. You probably should be eliminating All space characters are simply substituted with newline characters as the variable is expanded. join(lines))" < input. Some versions of sed may not need the trailing backslash. I'd like to print the result of a command like 'cut' to console without the newline character at the end, much like 'echo -n' does. We redirect input file into (b) Use a script file with one backslash '\' in the script, immediately followed by a newline. If so, remove it. To explain it we need to define each one of the built-in variables: RS record sed 's/ /\n/g' example. It uses the $'. 0. See the QUOTING section of the bash man page. It would be sufficient to find a command which eliminates the newline and doesn't put it back when it outputs the result, like Otherwise, changing. com/questions/1251999/sed-how-can-i-replace-a-newline-n