Gear inches for hills

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The bicycle is a wonderful human powered machine. It may seem that this will give the same results as the first experiment, but in practice it does not; it gives you more information. The 66 inch gear was a little short for my fairly flat commute, but did allow me to climb the odd hill. Jan 13, 2015 The best way to compare chainring and cassette combinations between bikes is to check their gear inches. Fixed Gear*, Track, 80-90. The next experiment is to ride hills that have different gradients, in the same gear for all of the hills. Medium hills, 32-42. Flat, 37-47. Technical trails, 17-20. Sep 29, 2009 I generally commute with about 81 gear inches, which does lead to a cadence on the slow side, generally about 70rpm. Road Racing, Steep hills, 47-60. Type of riding, Terrain, Gear Inches. To me, when bikepacking, that magical number falls around 19 gear inches or under — specifically for a mountain bike destined for steep terrain and trails. Sport Touring, Steep hills, 27-37. Dirt roads, 20-27. Here's a guide I've put together for an “average” rider who is looking for enough gears to get up hills on their tour. A friend described this as 'Mendip standard'. I use a 44x16 (74. A road bike with a 34-tooth inner chainring and 30-tooth bottom sprocket will provide this. An important Jun 21, 2016 It's basically derived from a formula and provides an indication of the mechanical advantage of different gears. If you don't want to change chainrings (and mess with chain length) UNDERSTANDING GEAR INCHES. While it may not be easy to get a bike set up with a 16 inch gear, it can be done. If you don't want to change chainrings (and mess with chain length) We can't put out the watts to drag ourselves up the hills with the standard low ranges, and the very top end is rarely used unless already flying down a hill The advice about checking your “gear inches” is excellent, but that answer is almost certainly a foregone conclusion. Don't want to do any gear-inch maths? Look for a small chainring (28 teeth or fewer) and a big sprocket (32 teeth or more). When I had a geared bike I would spin at a far higher cadence, typically about 100rpm. Let's me get up them and not spin too crazy fast on the downhills. Values for 'gear inches' typically range from 20 (very low gearing) via 70 (medium gearing) to 125 (very high gearing); as in a car, low gearing is for going up hills and high gearing is for Type of riding, Terrain, Gear Inches. Keep track of the time and cadence again, and make another graph. 9) on my other fixed gear. Road, 60-70. Somewhere in the range of 75 gear inches or slightly less seems to work best for me for hills. I live near the Mendips, just south of Bristol. Oct 2, 2011 When i found my fixie (at the dump) it was fitted with a 66 inch gear. Now you can see why the competitive types can climb hills with those tiny freewheels! But for those of us who don't do time trials at 28 MPH, much lower gearing is appropriate. Flat to rolling, 57-66. Loaded Touring, Steep hills, 20-27. 2 GI) on my Kilo and a 45x16 (75. For fully loaded touring . They're very easy to calculate: it's the your experience and how strong you are. Once you know where you stand you have some Jun 21, 2016 Again, different strokes for different folks — literally — but I'll share what I've found. Most gearing is measured in 'Gear inches' and for fully loaded touring I would suggest a range from @100" at the high end to @18" at the low end. My philosophy towards the fixie and the GI I run is I want a hard gear on hills etc, to build leg Jan 14, 2018 Therefore there is a low end to cope with the hills but still with a high end to give you a high cruising speed on the flat should you wish. Mountain bikes and touring bikes offer this and so do some hybrids. 5 MPH on the flats. Mar 31, 2014 For heavier or less fit riders, load hauling, steeper hills, or all four, look for a bottom gear of around 20 inches. Mar 31, 2014 For sportier commuter bikes and/or sportier riders, a bottom gear of around 30 inches is probably sufficient in hillier areas. Mtn bike, Steep hills, 17-20. Gear inches is one of several relative measures of bicycle gearing, giving an indication of the mechanical advantage of different gears. This is a result of bicycle gearing and something known as a 'gear inch'. An important Jan 13, 2015 The best way to compare chainring and cassette combinations between bikes is to check their gear inches. It enables us to propel our bodies forward and travel with a relatively low amount effort and force on the flats and up and down the hills. And remember, the 100 W rider can average 17. I haven't been up Cheddar gorge on it however. by Coach Troy Jacobson. Values for gear inches typically range from 18 (very low gearing) via 70 (medium gearing) to 125 (very high gearing); as in a car, low gearing is for going up hills and high gearing is for going fast